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Wednesday of Hope – Dragons Can Be Killed

Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.

– G.K. Chesterton

 

The Necessity of Imagination and Art

What if imagination and art are not frosting at all, but the fountainhead of human experience?

– Rollo May, The Courage to Create

Wednesday of Hope – Virtue

Hope is not merely a feeling. Hope is a virtue, a firmly established attitude of the heart, a basic bearing of the whole person.

– David Steindl-Rast

Love that Can Bridge All Divisions

In a world so torn apart by rivalry, anger, and hatred, we have the privileged vocation to be living signs of a love that can bridge all divisions and heal all wounds.

– Henri Nouwen

Wednesday of Hope – Sharing a Common Destiny

To really belong to one another and to depend on one another — to really share a common destiny — is difficult for a community that wants to be diverse. It is also the community’s only hope of survival.  

– Gordon Cosby

Happy Easter 2018

[Writing of his wife Katharine, who was planning the planting of bulbs in her garden even though she knew she likely would not live to see the spring.] There was something comical yet touching in her bedraggled appearance…. The small hunched-over figure, her studied absorption in the implausible notion that there would be yet another spring, oblivious to the ending of her own days, which she knew perfectly well was near at hand, sitting there with her detailed chart under those dark skies in dying October, calmly plotting the resurrection.

– E. B. White, Quoted in A Time to Live by Robert Raines

Wednesday of Hope – An Astonishing Mix

What the Day Gives

Suddenly, sun. Over my shoulder
in the middle of gray November
what I hoped to do comes back,
asking.

Across the street the fiery trees
hold onto their leaves,
red and gold in the final months
of this unfinished year,
they offer blazing riddles..

In the frozen fields of my life
there are no shortcuts to spring, 
but stories of great birds in migration
carrying small ones on their backs,
predators flying next to warblers
they would, in a different season, eat.

Stunned by the astonishing mix in this uneasy world
that plunges in a single day from despair
to hope and back again, I commend my life
to Ruskin’s difficult duty of delight,
and to that most beautiful form of courage,
to be happy.

– Jeanne Lohmann, The Light of Invisible Bodies