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Posts tagged ‘thirst’

Thirst by Mary Oliver

The pond God has given us

The pond God has given us


Another morning and I wake with thirst

for the goodness I do not have.
I walk
out to the pond and all the way God has


given us such beautiful lessons.
Oh Lord,
I was never a quick scholar but sulked


and hunched over my books past the hour

and the bell; grant me, in your mercy,
a little more time.

Love for the earth
and love for you are having such a long


conversation in my heart.
Who knows what
will finally happen or where I will be sent,


yet already I have given a great many things

away, expecting to be told to pack nothing,

except the prayers which, with this thirst,

I am slowy learning.



— Mary Oliver, Thirst,
  Beacon Press, Boston, 2006, pp. 1, 52, 69

Good Things to Thirst for

Yogis are drunk on discipline. Priests are drunk on scriptures. Celibates are drunk on vanity. Monks are drunk on prestige. So what’s left for you? What could you possibly get drunk on? I recommend being drunk on peace, being drunk on joy, being drunk on the fulfillment of the quest of a human being.
-Maharji

sausalito

Let’s be drunk on peace

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflection

My Thirsty Fish

My Thirsty Fish and Ambient Reflections in a Pool

In Lent, as in any season, a poem from Rumi is a welcome reflection

From “A Thirsty Fish” by Rumi

I don’t get tired of you. Don’t grow weary
of being compassionate toward me!

All this thirst equipment
must surely be tired of me,
the waterjar, the water carrier.

I have a thirsty fish in me
that can never find enough
of what it’s thirsty for!

Show me the way to the ocean!
Break these half-measures,
these small containers.

All this fantasy
and grief.

Hafiz on Thirst

el_salvador_grp1 202

Bring your cup

I Know the Way You Can Get

I know the way you can get
When you have not had a drink of Love:
Your face hardens,
Your sweet muscles cramp.
Children become concerned
About a strange look that appears in your eyes
Which even begins to worry your own mirror
And nose.
Squirrels and birds sense your sadness
And call an important conference in a tall tree.
They decide which secret code to chant
To help your mind and soul.
Even angels fear that brand of madness
That arrays itself against the world
And throws sharp stones and spears into
The innocent
And into one’s self.
O I know the way you can get
If you have not been drinking Love:
You might rip apart
Every sentence your friends and teachers say,
Looking for hidden clauses.
You might weigh every word on a scale
Like a dead fish.
You might pull out a ruler to measure
From every angle in your darkness
The beautiful dimensions of a heart you once
Trusted.
I know the way you can get
If you have not had a drink from Love’s Hands.
That is why all the Great Ones speak of
The vital need
To keep remembering God,
So you will come to know and see Him
As being so Playful
And Wanting,
Just Wanting to help.
That is why Hafiz says:
Bring your cup near me.
For all I care about
Is quenching your thirst for freedom!
All a Sane man can ever care about
Is giving Love!

– Hafiz

Quenching Our Thirst

Let’s choose today to quench our thirst for the ”good life” we thinks others lead by acknowledging the good that already exists in our lives. We can then offer the universe the gift of our grateful hearts.

– Sarah Breathnach

redwoods_monastery_2013_142

Lifting our grateful hearts

A Lenten Thirst

On this 3rd Sunday of Lent, we read about Moses angrily striking a rock in Horeb when the Israelites had thirst and of the woman of Samaria who asked Jesus for living water. So this week our Lenten reflections are about thirst.

Love shortens time, changes the hours. Love is invincible. Many waters cannot quench it nor the floods drown. The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved.

– Victor Hugo

Many waters cannot quench love

Many waters cannot quench love

Mary Oliver’s Wisdom

Just take a seat, I'll be with you in a minute.

Just take a seat, I’ll be with you in a minute.

Making the House Ready for the Lord
By Mary Oliver
Dear Lord, I have swept and I have washed but
still nothing is as shining as it should be
for you. Under the sink, for example, is an
uproar of mice –it is the season of their
many children. What shall I do? And under the eaves
and through the walls the squirrels
have gnawed their ragged entrances –but it is the season
when they need shelter, so what shall I do? And
the raccoon limps into the kitchen and opens the cupboard
while the dog snores, the cat hugs the pillow;
what shall I do? Beautiful is the new snow falling
in the yard and the fox who is staring boldly
up the path, to the door. And I still believe you will
come, Lord: you will, when I speak to the fox,
the sparrow, the lost dog, the shivering sea-goose, know
that really I am speaking to you whenever I say,
as I do all morning and afternoon: Come in, Come
Source:Thirst, by Mary Oliver. Boston: Beacon Press, 2006. p. 13 – Found on the Education for Justice website.