Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘Teresa of Avila’

Today is the Feast of St. Teresa of Avila

The Spanish countryside and bright red poppies, with which St. Teresa would have become well accustomed on her journeys

The Spanish countryside and bright red poppies, with which St. Teresa would have become well accustomed on her journeys

Saint Teresa of Avila was a very strong woman who reformed the Carmelite Order, and is one of the three women doctors of the Church, along with Saints Therese of Lisieux (another Carmelite) and Catherine of Siena (a Dominican).

For prayer is nothing else than being on the terms of friendship with God.

– St. Teresa of Avila

Christ Has No Body

cool_globes_2008_027Today’s Lenten poem from Education for Justice is by St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582). I am familiar with the poem and have always thought of it as the Prayer of St. Teresa.

Christ Has No Body

Christ has no body but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
Compassion on this world,
Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good,
Yours are the hands, with which he blesses all the world.
Yours are the hands, yours are the feet,
Yours are the eyes, you are his body.
Christ has no body now but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
compassion on this world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

Today is the Feast of Teresa of Avila. So I am reporting re-posting last year’s picture of the lovely red poppies in Spain.

OPreach

Today is the Feast of St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582). She was a Doctor of the Church, also a mystic and writer – and truly a practical, down-to-earth woman who saw into the heart of God, and truly made a difference in her world. Teresa reformed the Carmelite Order during the very difficult pass in the Catholic Church of the Spanish Inquisition.

Through it all, she kept her marvelous sense of humor. Once, after being thrown from a carriage into the mud, she said to God, “If this is how you treat your friends, it’s no wonder you have so few of them.” She was serious about her spiritual practices and being observant to, what we would call, strict religious practices. Nonetheless, she enjoyed life to the fullest, and  encouraged her sisters to do the same. One wonderful story tells how Teresa danced on the table during recreation!

Perhaps it…

View original post 58 more words

Some Wisdom from Teresa of Avila

It is better to attempt . . . to live in silence and in hope.
(Statue from the Detroit Airport . . . with some post-processing)

When we were in our chapel at morning prayer, I noted how the reading in our breviary (Thursday, Week III) complemented the Gospel reading for the day in which we are admonished to give, forgive, and to not judge.

Let us look at our own shortcomings and leave other people’s alone; for those who live carefully ordered lives are apt to be shocked at everything and we might well learn very important lessons from the persons who shock us. Our outward comportment and behaviour may be better than theirs, but this, though good, is not the most important thing: there is no reason why we should expect everyone else to travel by our own road, and we should not attempt to point them to the spiritual path when perhaps we do not know what it is. . . It is better to attempt to . . . live in silence and in hope, and [God] will take care of [God’s] own. 

-St. Teresa of Avila (from People’s Companion to the Breviary)

There is a Time for Feasting and a Time for Fasting

In today’s Gospel from Matthew 9:14-15 we read:

The disciples of John approached Jesus and said,
“Why do we and the Pharisees fast much,
but your disciples do not fast?”
Jesus answered them, “Can the wedding guests mourn
as long as the bridegroom is with them?
The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them,
and then they will fast.”

I am reminded that once when St. Teresa of Avila and her sisters were criticized for enjoying a fine meal of partridge, her reply was, “There is a time for penance and a time for partridge.” Holy Spirit grant us the wisdom to know the difference – and the grace to recognize that these seasons come to others at different times than they may to us.

There is a time for feasting and a time for fasting

St. Teresa of Avila

Today is the Feast of St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582). She was a Doctor of the Church, also a mystic and writer – and truly a practical, down-to-earth woman who saw into the heart of God, and truly made a difference in her world. Teresa reformed the Carmelite Order during the very difficult pass in the Catholic Church of the Spanish Inquisition.

Through it all, she kept her marvelous sense of humor. Once, after being thrown from a carriage into the mud, she said to God, “If this is how you treat your friends, it’s no wonder you have so few of them.” She was serious about her spiritual practices and being observant to, what we would call, strict religious practices. Nonetheless, she enjoyed life to the fullest, and  encouraged her sisters to do the same. One wonderful story tells how Teresa danced on the table during recreation!

Perhaps it was the beauty of the Spanish countryside that gave her such a sense of passion and the joy of God.

Field of poppies in Spain. Might Teresa have feasted her eyes on these?

Teresa wrote:

Let nothing trouble you, let nothing frighten you.
 All things are passing; God never changes.
 Patience obtains all things.
 The one who possesses God lacks nothing:
 God alone suffices.

Did she learn this from the poppies?